Strategic Plan & Partnerships

The 2011 Strategic Plan and Partnerships outlines seven priorities based on our consultations with the two committees. We have identified initial action and projects on which to focus in the coming months; however, the plan will be updated and expanded on by March 31, 2012. We outlined a Labour Market Planning Model and a Strategic Framework to guide the development of these seven priorities.

The key components of the Strategic Plan include:

  • Labour Market Planning Model
  • Strategic Framework
  • Strategic Plan for 2011
    • Priority Area #1 – Build connections across sectors – focus on emerging opportunities
    • Priority Area #2 – Build connections between demand and the labour force – focus on cross-sectoral skills
    • Priority Area #3 – Build connections with the labour force – focus on key populations
    • Priority Area #4 – Build connections between SMEs and the labour force – focus on business/HR support
    • Priority Area #5 – Build cultural competence – focus on both employers and the workforce
    • Priority Area #6 – Build innovation and entrepreneurship – focus on individual and organization skills to become Canada’s innovation capital
    • Priority Area #7 – Build connections between industry and government – focus on educating and consulting on a collaborative approach to labour market planning

LABOUR MARKET PLANNING MODEL

To frame our thinking around the strategic plan and planning priorities, we have developed a Labour Market model that shows both the supply and demandside of Labour Market Planning. In looking at priorities and actions that can be taken to address the issues identified, it is important to consider both sides of the equation. We need to have a clear understanding of the labour market demand to ensure that the supply is leveraged to meet current and future needs. While attracting and retaining demand falls more within the realm of economic development, the Ottawa ILLMP group has considered this component, and may take action in that arena where it fits within our strategic framework.

Labour Market Planning Model_Eng
 

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STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK

In addition to long-term strategies, some imminent planning priorities have been identified for 2011-2012.

  • Convergence is bringing forth new emerging jobs that fuse skills and knowledge from multiple disciplines. Identifying emerging demand and focusing on the required multi-disciplinary skills and knowledge will be key. Initial areas identified on which to focus include: green construction,Ottawa’s LRT initiative, and health technology/e-health.
  • Employers are demanding certain cross-sectoral skills: behavioural competencies around people, communication and management skills, as well as basic technical skills and emerging multidisciplinary skills. Enhancing these skill-sets, particularly for workers in ICT and health, is a priority.
  • Ottawa needs to effectively tap into labour supply to increase employment and address labour shortages in key areas. Immigrants,aboriginals and youth have all been identified as key populations on which to focus; many of whom are unemployed or under-employed.
  • Ottawa’s employers have to be prepared for the oncoming labour shortages by engaging in strategic workforce planning. They needsupport in succession planning, talent management, business planning and marketing.
  • Creating a culturally competent workforce and leveragingmultilingual skills should help Ottawa businesses’ tap into new markets/ economies.
  • Entrepreneurship, particularly youth entrepreneurship, needs to be encouraged and supported if the economy is to grow in the long-term, particularly in growth industries (health, ICT and construction).
  • We need to focus on innovation across all sectors to ensure that Ottawa is well-positioned in today’s knowledge economy and look for opportunities to brand the city as Canada’s innovation capital.
  • A supportive relationship between governments and industry and a collaborative approach to labour market planning that engages key stakeholders is critical to Ottawa’s success.

The graphic below outlines the framework and the 2011 priorities which are detailed in the Strategic Plan section of this report. The Labour Market Planning and Service Delivery Committees have identified a phased approach to strategic planning, focusing on key priorities and sectors. The committees will review issues on an on-going basis and determine priorities based onmaximizing the impact on Ottawa’s economy. For example, although the tourism sector was not identified as a short-term labour market priority for 2011, it is an integral part of Ottawa’s economy that offers opportunity for development and may be identified as a priority area in 2012-2013.

The Strategic Framework for Ottawa focuses on collaboration andinnovation. The long-term strategy is to develop Ottawa into Canada’s innovation capital and meet labour demand through developing a multi-pronged approach to labour supply. Building connections and educating the community will be an integral part of integrated labour market planning. These components will be incorporated into all priorities addressed in the coming years.

LMO Strategic framework

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Note that some of the priorities identified here may only be addressed in 2012, as we are behind the annual timelines in preparing this initial Ottawa Integrated Local Labour Market Plan.

STRATEGIC PLAN FOR 2011

Priority Area #1

Build connections across sectors – focus on emerging opportunities

priority area 1 i1 E

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As we move into a knowledge economy, employers are demanding certaincross-sectoral skills: behavioural competencies around people, communication and management skills, as well as basic technical skills andemerging multidisciplinary skills. Enhancing these skill-sets, particularly for workers in knowledge-based sectors such as ICT and health, is a priority. (This priority focuses specifically on the multi-disciplinary skills.) In our research and consultations, green construction, Ottawa’s LRT initiative and Health technology/e-Health were identified as the initial emerging opportunities on which to focus.

PAST ACTIONS TAKEN

  • No past actions have been identified for this issue at this point.

priority area 1 i2 e

 

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Priority Area #2

Build connections between demand and the labour force – focus on cross-sectoral skills.

priority area 2 i1 e

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Due to the shift to the knowledge economy, employers are demanding certain cross-sectoral skills: behavioural competencies around people, communication and management skills, as well as basic technical skills and emerging multidisciplinary skills. Due to the rapid change occurring due to convergence, current programming has been slower to adapt and still focuses on specifics or functional approaches rather than multidisciplinary approaches. Enhancing these skill-sets, particularly for workers in ICT and health, is a priority.

PAST ACTIONS TAKEN

  • No past actions have been identified for this issue at this point.

priority area 2 i2 e

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Priority Area #3

Build connections between demand and the labour force – focus on cross-sectoral skills.

priority area 3 i1 e

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Ottawa needs to effectively tap into labour supply to increase employment and address labour shortages in key areas. Immigrants, aboriginals andyouth have all been identified as key populations on which to focus. Many of them are unemployed or under-employed due to both demand issues (systemic discrimination; employer resistance) and supply issues (lack of appropriate training, language and/ or cultural skills; lack of social capital). Consultations revealed that while much is being done around the immigrant labour force, there is not one clear source of information to access all the supports and tools available to both employers and potential employees in Ottawa.

PAST ACTIONS TAKEN

  • No past actions have been identified for this issue at this point.

priority area 3 i2 e

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Priority Area #4

Build connections between SMEs and the labour force – focus on business/HR support

priority area 4 i1 e

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Ottawa’s employers have to be prepared for the oncoming labour shortages by engaging in strategic workforce planning. Particularly in owner-operated businesses and other micro-enterprises, employers need support in succession planning. The need for knowledge of talent management, business planning and marketing is widely applicable to small and medium sized enterprises. Our consultations determined that the initial focus would be onSMEs in the construction sector.

PAST ACTIONS TAKEN

  • No past actions have been identified for this issue at this point.

priority area 4 i2 e

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Priority Area #5

Build cultural competence – focus on both employers and the workforce

priority area 5 i1 e

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Ottawa’s employers have to be prepared for the oncoming labour shortages. Employers, particularly smaller businesses, do not often engage in labour market planning and forecasting. As specified previously, they need support in succession planning, talent management, business planning and marketing. A key part of hiring and managing their workforce effectively includes beingculturally competent. This is particularly necessary if the underutilized populations ­ immigrants, aboriginals and youth (millennials/Generation Z) ­ are to be integrated into the workforce.

Creating a culturally competent workforce and leveraging multilingual skills should help Ottawa businesses’ tap into new markets/ economies.

PAST ACTIONS TAKEN

  • No past actions have been identified for this issue at this point.

priority area 5 i2 e

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Priority Area #6

Build innovation and entrepreneurship – focus on individual and organization skills to become Canada’s innovation capital

priority area 6 i1 e

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Entrepreneurship¸ particularly youth entrepreneurship, needs to be encouraged and supported if the economy is to grow in the long-term, particularly in growth industries (health, ICT and construction). Recent data shows that university-educated workers, particularly those between 25-29 years showed the greatest increase in self-employment in Canada.

We need to focus on innovation across all sectors to ensure that Ottawa is well-positioned in today’s knowledge economy and look for opportunities to brand the city as Canada’s innovation capital.

PAST ACTIONS TAKEN

  • No past actions have been identified for this issue at this point (with the exception of the identification of the TalentBridge program).

priority area 6 i2 e

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Priority Area #7

Build connections between industry and government – focus on educating and consulting on a collaborative approach to labour market planning

priority area 7 i1 e

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A supportive relationship between governments and industry and acollaborative approach to labour market planning that engages key stakeholders is critical to Ottawa’s success.

Ottawa has a unique challenge – many jobs require potential employees to obtain security clearances. These clearances cost employers money, delay staffing and increase barriers to employment. Finding a way to streamline security clearances is of great significance to Ottawa employers.

PAST ACTIONS TAKEN

  • No past actions have been identified for this issue at this point.

priority area 7 i2 e

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Title: Strategic Plan & Partnerships
Date: December 2011